Gay Pride Parade… March… Parade.

I’m heterosexual and I’m not proud of it, it’s just who I am but let me say that it’s very easy to be an heterosexual in a society like ours.

Unfortunately there are a lot of people out there so uneducated that pretend to know what is right and what is wrong dealing with the self-consciousness of other people.

That’s what I had to be focused on while I was watching the Gay Pride March two days ago, on 5th avenue, New York.

It was 10Am and I was on Lexington avenue: no music, no colors, just some tourists when I saw some policeman and a rainbow flag; there it was: the “backstage of the show”.

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And this has been the best part of the day: there were people working on their tracks, registering at the volunteer stand, trying to get the best spot along the 5th avenue  for watching the event.

I had the chance to talk to some of these protagonists and spectators and I think they were the “march part” of this “not a march but a parade” day.

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After the all day I couldn’t stop thinking about the family you saw on the video, the 2 dads and their lovely daughter: she never stopped smiling and embracing and kissing her dad. They all seemed happy and so nice!

I thought about the words of those parents who introduced their children as a blessing just like every couple of parents in the world should do, but there was something more in their words, maybe all the bureaucratic and social problems they had to pass through.

I found my self wondering about adoptions from gay or lesbian parents: I never had and still don’t have a clear personal opinion about that (instead I’m a strong supporter of gay marriage), but that kid was just simply happy.

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Then I took part to the press conference and the introduction of the marshall of this year march:

Earl Fowlkes, president and CEO of the Center for Black Equity, formerly the International Federation of Black Pride (IFBP). The Center for Black Equity is the only international black LGBT organization.

Edie Windsor,  who brought the successful case against DOMA after being hit with a $363,000 tax bill following her wife’s death. For more information visit United States vs Windsor.

Harry Belafonte, an American singer, songwriter, actor and social activist.

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There were people talking about rights, laws, facts, personal experiences… And one of them (I’m so sorry I didn’t write down the name) really impressed me. This guy:

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He was talking about the love of his life who tragically died in an accident after they get married in California, built their company and adopted a child. What I want to say is that Love, when real, is simply Love.

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I’m still touched by his story.

And finally the march started… and I began to be perplexed.

The name of the event refers to a march, but what I saw was a Parade. A parade of all the sponsors (Vitamin water, Wells Fargo and others), some college and universities association (like the Gay, Lesbian, And Straight Society of Baruch College, Montclair State University – LGBT Center, Pace University’s GSA and others) and various other private organizations.

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Some were dispensing gifts (I had a lot of pens and condoms), others performed dances and shows, others were just collecting signatures.

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This is the case of the Christine Quinn time, a Democratic politician and the current Speaker of the New York City Council (for more information visit her website).

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Because in the end this is what it’s all about: politics and money!

But I was still asking myself: what is this march about? Is was a continuos whole of tracks, people, gifts and music. There were no speeches, no information, no emotions but a lot characters… And there it was: the “parade part”…

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